A blog about planning, planning law and planning policy

Disclaimer

The information on this blog is not intended to be advice, legal or otherwise. You should not rely on it and I do not accept liability in connection with it. If you do have a planning law question on which you would like advice, seek legal advice from a suitably qualified solicitor. Specific advice should be sought for specific problems.

National Planning Practice Guidance – bungalows, supply and demand and CPRE

The draft NPPG is now available on line after a couple of days of glitches – I have given the link below. Trailed by DCLG over the Bank Holiday weekend, the newspapers picked up on the proposals that more bungalows should be built for the elderly, including clusters only available to older people. And CPRE […]

Development, growth, George Osborne and the green belt.

It’s very interesting how George Osborne and his advisers seem to get planning, as the modern system was introduced in 1947. There was a presumption in favour of development, planning was to rebuild the country and the idea was to enable development to happen. See the Uthwatt report for example. So the Chancellor of the […]

Picture postcard Britain

Where would you expect to see these cottages?

On a chocolate box perhaps, or on the wall in a tea-room? I got my new passport back today. For a number of reasons I have not been looking forward to renewing my passport. The first is that it has an electronic chip with information in […]

“Protecting the Wider Countryside” – CPRE and the NPPF

I see that CPRE have released another report today, “Protecting the Wider Countryside” claiming that only 49% of the countryside will be protected if the NPPF is adopted in its present form. That is the area which is protected by a national designation. The rest is undesignated. So CPRE argue that it should be subject […]

NPPF – a need for reasoned debate.

Twenty-three former presidents of the RTPI have written to the Telegraph today calling for reasoned debate on the draft NPPF and offering the resources of the RTPI to mediate what they call the openly-hostile debate. That is very helpful.

The National Trust can perhaps claim to have got the ball rolling with its petition […]